Structure of the Earth

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The structure of the Earth is layered, and  divided into four parts: the crust, the mantle, the liquid  outer core, and the solid inner core.
The core. This part of the earth is about 1,800 miles (2,900 km) below the earth’s surface. The core is a dense ball of the elements iron and nickel. It is divided into two layers, the inner core and the outer core. The inner core – is solid and about 780 miles (1,250 km) thick. The outer core is about 1370 miles (2,200 km) thick.
The layer above the core is the mantle. It begins about 6 miles(10 km) below the oceanic crust and about 19 miles(30 km) below the continental crust (see The Crust). It is about 1,800 miles(2,900 km) thick and makes up nearly 80 percent of the Earth’s total volume.
The crust lays above the mantle and is the earth’s hard outer shell, . In relation with the other layers the crust is much thinner. It floats upon the softer, denser mantle. The crust is made up of solid material but these material is not everywhere the same. There is an Oceanic crust and a Continental crust. The first one is about 4-7 miles (6-11 km) thick and consists of heavy rocks, like basalt. The Continental crust is thicker than the Oceanic crust, about 19 miles(30 km) thick. It is mainly made up of light material, like granite.