The Plantations

SECTION   8

THE   PLANTATIONS

 

IN  THE  SIXTEENTH  CENTURY,  THE  ENGLISH  GOVERNMENT  WAS  ATTEMPTING  TO  CONTROL  OVER  THE  WHOLE   COUNTRY  OF  IRELAND.  ONE  OF  THE  MAIN  WAYS  TO  DO  THIS  WAS  TO  DRIVE  THE  LANDOWNERS  OFF THE  LAND  AND REPLACE  THEM  WITH  ENGLISH  AND  SCOTTISH  SETTLERS.  THIS  WAS  KNOWN  AS PLANTATION.  OVER  THE  NEXT 100  YEARS  THE  LAND  OF  IRELAND  CHANGED  HANDS  AS  A  RESULT  OF   A  NUMBER  OF  PLANTATIONS.

 

ENGLAND  WAS  INSPIRED  BY  THE  AMERICAN  EMPIRES  OF  SPAIN  AND  PORTUGAL  WHERE  COLONIES  HAD  DEVELOPPED.   AS  THE  IRISH  COULD  NOT  BE  TRUSTED  TO  SUPPORT  THE  KING  OF  ENGLAND  THEY  BELIEVED  THAT  NEW  ENGLISH  SETTLERS  SHOULD  BE  BROUGHT  TO  IRELAND.

 

**  When  studying  each  Plantation,  it  is  important  to  note  when  it  occurred,  under  whose  reign,  what  happened  and  whether  it  was  a  success  or  a  failure. **

The  Plantation  of  Laois  and  Offaly

 

This  was the  first  plantation  and  was  carried  out in  1556  under  the  reign  of  Queen  Mary.  The  Gaelic  clans,  the  O  Moores  and  the  O  Connors,  had  carried  out  raids  continuously,  in  Laois  and  Offaly.  English armies  were  sent  to  defeat  them  but  failed.  Queen  Mary  decided  to  plant  this  area.

Two thirds  of the  land  was  taken  from the  Irish  and  they  were  sent  to  the  land  bordering  the Shannon.  English  settlers  were  given  the  land  but  had  to  build  their  own  houses  and  keep  armies  on  the  land.  They  were  not  allowed  to  marry  into  Irish  families  or   keep  any  Irish  on  the  land.  Laois  became  Queen’s  County  and  Offaly  became  King’s  County.

It  was  not  a  success  because  it  had  many  difficulties.  There  were not  enough  English  settlers,  the  Irish  clans  kept  attacking  and  the  Irish  had  to  be  hired  to work  on  the  land.  Also,  the  Irish  language  and  customs  remained  in  use  and  the  Gaelic  Irish  did  actually  receive  grants  of  land.

 

The  Munster  Plantation

In  the  1570’s  the  Fitzgerald’s  of  Desmond  rebelled  against  the  new  Queen  of  England,  Queen  Elizabeth.  English  armies  destroyed  much  of  Munster.  Elizabeth  was  afraid  that  Ireland  would  receive  help  from  Spain  so  she  decided  to  plant  Munster  in  1586  to  make  it  a  loyal  place.

New   maps  were  drawn  up  of  Munster.  English  and  Scottish  undertakers  were  set  up  on  estates  in  Munster.  These  had  to  undertake  to  follow  English  rule.  The  land  was  divided  into  20  estates.  The  undertakers  had  to  remove  all  Irish  from  their  land  and  bring  over  from  England  91  tenants  and  farm  animals.  They  were  also  expected  to  introduce  the  English methods  of  farming  to  Ireland.  Each  undertaker  had  to  pay  rent  to  the  government.

The  Plantation  was  not  a   success.  Much  of  the  land  had  been  damaged  from  the  Desmond  rebellion  and  so  was  not  good  farming  land.  The  Gaelic  Clans  still  attacked  so  many  English  planters  went  home,  leaving  only  3000  behind.  This  resulted  in  many  Irish  being  employed  on  the  estates.  In  1598,  Hugh  O  Neill  sent  an  army  to  Munster  and  attacked  the  English  settlers.  By  1600,  the  plantation  was  in  ruins.

 

The  Plantation  of   Ulster

Between  1594  and  1603,  O  Neill  and  O  Donnell,  led  a  rebellion  against  Queen  Elizabeth.  It  was  known  as  the  Nine  Years  War.  They  asked  the  Spanish  king  for  help.  Spanish  troops  landed  in   Kinsale  in  1601  but  were  defeated  by  the  English  armies.  The  English  were  determined  to  destroy  the  Ulster  Chieftains  and  under  the Treaty  of  Mellifont,  O Neill  had  to  give  up  Gaelic  customs,  allow  the  English  as  sheriffs  onto  his  land  and
live  by  English  law.  By  1607,  the  Ulster  chiefs  could  no  longer  put  up  with  these  restrictions  and  so  left  Ireland  for  Europe.  This  was  known  as  the  Flight  of  the  Earls.  With  the  powerful  Earls  gone,  the  English  could  now  gain  full  control  of  Ulster.

In  1603,  King  James  I  took  over  England.  He  took  6  counties  in  Ulster –  Donegal,  Derry, Tyrone,  Fermanagh,  Armagh  and  Cavan –  to  be  planted  by  English  and  Scottish  planters.  James  had  learnt  from  the  mistakes  of  the  previous  plantations  and  was  determined  to  make  this  one  a  success.

Planters  were   ordered  to  bring  over  English  and  Scottish  tenants  and  craftsmen.  There  would  be  3  types  of  planters :  Undertakers, Servitors  and  Irish  landowners.

Undertakers :   Gentlement  to  receive  estates  of  2,000, 1,500 or  1,000  acres.  They  would  charge  low  rent to  tenants  and  were  not  allowed  Irish  tenants.

Servitors :  Men  who  had  served  the  king  as  soldiers.  Received  estates  of  1,000  acres.  They   were  allowed  to  take  Irish  tenants.

Irish  landowners  “of  good  merit” :  Irishmen  who  were  loyal  to  the  king.  The  servitors  kept  an  eye  on  them.  They  were  allowed  to  take  Irish  tenants but  charged  them  high  rent.

The  undertakers  and  servitors  had  to  build  a  bawn  which  would  protect  their  area  from  attack.  New  towns  were  set  up,  ruled  by  a  council.

The  plantation  did  have  problems.  Not  enough  undertakers  went  to  Ulster  so  the  English  Government   forced  London  trade  guilds  to  take  part.   Undertakers  also  took  Irish  tenants  as  they  paid  higher  rent.  The  Gaelic  Irish   still  attacked  the  planters.

Having  said  all  this  however,  the  Ulster  Plantation  was  the  first  one to  be  largely  successful.  Most  of  the  best  land  was  now  in  the hands  of  the  English or  Scottish  settlers.  The  English  language  and  custom  was   soon  introduced.  A  new  way  of  life  developped  in  Ulster  with  a  new  Protestant  religion  or  Presbyterian  religion.  Ulster  was now  divided  and  is  still  divided  today  because  of  the  Ulster  Plantation.

The   Cromwellian  Plantation

In  1641  rebellion  broke out  in  Ulster.  Thousands  of  settlers  were  killed  by  Irish  rebels.  However,  England’s  king,  Charles  I  was  not  able  to  do  anything  about  it  at  that  time  because  he  was  fighting  a civil  war  against  Oliver  Cromwell  in  England.  In  1649,  Cromwell  defeated  Charles.  He  was  now  free  to  go  to  Ireland  and  get  revenge  for  the  massacres of  the  Protestant  settlers.

Upon  his  arrival  in  Ireland  Cromwell  captured  Drogheda  and  massacred  many  of  the  Gaelic  Irish.  This  resulted  in  towns  all  over Ireland  giving up.  Cromwell  got  rid  of  many  Irish  priests  by  sending  them  out  to  the  West  Indies.  He  decided  to give  the  land  to  Englishmen  who  supported  the  parliament  and to  soldiers  who  had  fought  with him  in  the  war.

 

The  land  was  surveyed  and  mapped  by  Sir  William  Petty.  This  was  known  as  the  Down  Survey.  Most  of  Munster,  Leinster  and  Connaught  were  taken  over  by  Cromwells  government.   Under  the  Act  of  Settlement  anyone  who  had  fought  against  the English  would  lose  his  land and  his  life.  Those  who  couldn’t  prove  their  loyalty  lost  their  land  only.  They  were  transplanted  to Connaught  (To  hell  or  to  Connaught).  The  farmers  and labourers  were  left  behind  to  work  for  the  new  English  landlords.

The  Cromwellian  Plantation  was not  without  its  problems.  Many  English  settlers  intermarried  with  the  Irish  and  children  were reared  as  Catholics.  Some  estates   were  sold  on  to  rich  Irish  landlords.

However,  the  plantation  was  mostly  successful.  90 %  of  the  land  now  belonged  to  English  Protestant  Planters.  Ireland  became  a  deeply  divided  country  between  Protestant  landlords  and  Catholic  tenants.

 

Results  of   Plantations

  1. Land  ownership  changed  hands.  Pre-plantations  90%  of  land belonged  to  Irish  Chieftains and  Earls.  Post-plantation  10%  of  land was  in  Irish  hands.
  2. Pre-plantations  the  main  religion  in  Ireland  was  Catholicism.  Post-plantation  a  new  religion  was  introduced,  Protestantism  or  Presbyterianism.
  3. Pre-plantations  the  main  language  was  Irish.  Post-plantation  the  new  language  was  English.
  4. New  English  customs  were  brought  in  to  Irish  culture.
  5. The   English  system  of  farming  was  now  developped  instead  of  the Irish  system.